Why Backup Deserves More Than One Day A Year: Weekly Roundup

Backing up your data one day a year just won't cut it. Too many things can go wrong — and fast — and once unprotected data is gone, it's likely gone forever. Solutions such as image backup and deduplication are just two ways that IT pros and average Joes can quickly and efficiently ensure their data is backed up and accessible when they need it. Here are a few data recovery and disaster planning tips and tricks from around the web this week: 

World Backup Day: 24 Hours Just Isn't Enough

World Backup Day and Backup Awareness Week, which both ended on Monday, remind us about the importance of protecting our digital lives. But one day, or one week, isn't enough. According to Forbes contributor, Tom Coughlin, surveys show that 20 to 35 percent of people don't consistently back up their data, which leaves them vulnerable to data loss. Nat Maple, senior vice president and general manager at Acronis, recommends that people follow the foolproof "3-2-1" rule. “People should have 3 copies of everything they care about, in 2 different formats, and 1 copy offsite. This is easy, quick and affordable for all users," says Maple in an interview, Protecting Digital Memories Is as Easy as '3-2-1'. 

Read more at Forbes

IT Spending On The Rise in 2014

This year, IT spending is predicted to increase worldwide by 3.2 percent (to about $3.8 trillion), driven by rebounding device sales and enterprise software, according to research firm Gartner. John Lovelock, research vice president at Gartner, tells ITWorld that next year will be different from 2013 when many organizations hunkered down and focused on planning software projects, not implementing them. An increased demand for mobile data, from mobile devices and applications, will drive much of the growth, says Lovelock. 

Read more at ITWorld

Deduplication Backup 101: What You Need To Know

IT organizations seeking to meet their service-level agreements (SLAs) by implementing faster backup services might consider deduplication backup as an option. Ashar Baig, a contributor for SearchDataBackup, writes that deduplication can "reduce the cost of backup storage and increase the performance of data backups and restores."

Deduplication stores individual data sequences in the system after an initial full data backup and discards all duplicate data elements. However, writes Baig, "Deduplication comes with its own costs as it consumes compute horsepower, server RAM and storage hardware IOPS, all of which lead to higher latency that impacts restore performance."

Read more at SearchDataBackup

Meet The BYOD Generation

Very soon, BYOD policies will just be part of the typical day-to-day for tomorrow's workforce. According to Kristin Rushowy, an education reporter for The Toronto Star, many schools in Ontario, Canada, allow students to bring their own devices. Sound like the challenges businesses face? In some respects, yes, but Rushowy points out that the problem for school districts is whether schools should provide devices for students who don't have a smartphone or tablet of their own. 

Read more at The Star

Sh*t Happens: Back Up Your Data Now Before It's Too Late

You know the feeling, the moment when you drop your smartphone in the toilet — or down a storm drain like a British teenager this week. And then you try to remember the last time you backed up the phone. Nothing, not the panic, tears or frustration, will help you restore your videos, photos, contacts or text messages. But its OK, you're reading this now and can back up your files before it's too late! 

Read more at Buzzfeed