Disaster recovery

Business Continuity Plan

As many as 25% of businesses who lose access to their data never reopen their doors.  This startling fact means that service providers practically have a moral obligation, if not a revenue incentive, to make sure that their customers have a business continuity plan.  Even in times when total outages are not occurring, employee productivity, customer satisfaction and company reputation can be affected.

Business continuity is the process of making sure the business information services are resilient to accidental, intentional or natural disruptions to their data.  Sometimes, the business continuity issue is simply human error. Perhaps someone deletes a key file from a system which causes it to break.  Other times, device failures or even natural disasters will require the implementation of the protocols in the business continuity plan. What do you need to consider when developing a business continuity plan? Read on to find out!

Disaster Recovery as a Service — Trends 2017

Next year’s developments in the cloud and data protection space will continue reshaping the DRaaS market. Just recovering data in a different location will no longer be enough. Customers will expect their data to be portable, verifiable, and protected against all types of cyber-attacks.

Disaster at the Devil's Tower

Disaster at the Devil's Tower

“Never update your system on Friday, 13th or on Halloween”. I knew the rule, I remembered it – but decided to ignore. I went ahead and began updating a few systems on October 31. I started the procedure late and with the last-minute requests and unruly users, my day has got away. I knew the update would go late into the night.

The sun was already down, and a light rain mixed with the wind created a gloomy atmosphere outside. Dark shadows mixed with swaying trees were not for the faint of heart. Then, the sky suddenly lit up as if it was in the middle of the day! It was so unusual that I dropped everything and ran outside.

Hi, I am Mark Jameson, the General Manager of Disaster Recovery Business at Acronis.  I am a business person, not a marketing person.  So why have I decided to write a blog? Well, today I felt compelled to share my thoughts with you because something important has happened.

According to a recent Enterprise Strategy Group study, only 8% of organizations have virtualized the majority of servers that could be. Another study from Techaisle shows that only 60% of servers were virtualized in 2014, and while the figure is expected to rise, total virtualization is nowhere in sight. The same study also noted some of the major challenges of virtualization, including costs and management complexity.

In light of recent U.S. and global catastrophes, disaster recovery (DR) and business continuity are top of mind for more and more IT professionals like you. Even CIOs are asking more questions about business continuity plans and how the IT department will respond in the event of a disaster.

According to an ITIC survey, one hour of downtime can cost over $100,000. If your company is smaller, you can be at an even greater risk. An estimated 25% of small businesses do not reopen following a major disaster. If you do not have a business continuity plan, your company can quickly become a statistic.

Data is the lifeline of your organization. You, as an IT system administrator, know this perfectly well through the daily trials and tribulations babysitting your IT systems, through the pain and suffering of getting things back up and running when they go down. Because of this you know that backing up everything you manage is essential – and maybe you even learned this hard way.

So, what do you do?

First, you select a complete and reliable backup solution, and provision it in your environment. However, when you get to the settings of your backup policy, you are stumped by the simple question: “Where do you want to back up to?”

“Hold on. Where do I want to back up?” you ask yourself. The software gives you multiple options – disk, network, cloud, tape – but which one is the best?

Well, it can be tricky – as there is no absolute best option. For example:

Many of you may know that a couple of weeks ago Gartner published its first-ever magic quadrant report on Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS). In case you missed it, Acronis is challenging the leaders in this space, and Gartner ranked us highest among the Challengers on our Ability to Execute.

But what does it really mean to you as a customer or future customer of Acronis?

All 14 players included in the Gartner Magic Quadrant are qualified vendors that have no doubt earned their placement in the report. With that said, each vendor offering differs in the way it approaches disaster recovery, the features it delivers, and the resources it allocates to the solution – all of which ultimately impact the actual solution delivered to customers.

So, the question is: How does Acronis differentiate, and where does Acronis fit in this landscape of disaster recovery solutions in the cloud?

Black Swan in the Data Center or How to Prepare for a Disaster

In today’s blog, I’d like to step away from the technical aspects of disaster recovery and focus on the human impact. With that in mind, I’d like to introduce you to one of my favorite books on the subject of predictability and inevitability: The Black Swan by Nassim Nicholas Taleb.

 

The book describes Black Swan events as unexpected and unpredictable. However, a person or organization can plan for negative events, and by doing so strengthen their ability to respond, as well as exploit positive events. Taleb contends in his book that people in general — and specifically within companies and enterprises — are very vulnerable to hazardous Black Swan events and can be exposed to high losses if unprepared.

 

Not if, but when!

 

Backup and Disaster Recovery Solution. When do you need it?

Companies, big and small, that heavily rely on IT, know very well that backup is not a luxury but a requirement. Whether it is your internal documents, or customer-facing marketing information, or fast-changing transactional data – it needs to be protected. Losing data is a disaster by itself, and can cause even more disastrous consequences if it is not restored in reasonable time.