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Five Simple Steps to Better Backups

Five Simple Steps for Better Backups

We might only be a few days removed from World Backup Day 2019, but the idea that 65% of consumers confirmed they suffered data loss (as revealed in our annual survey of attitudes and habits about data protection) has been rolling around in my head ever since. After all, that’s nearly 30% more people who reported they or a family member lost data in 2018 – a significant jump.

The fact we all use more data and we’re accessing that data on more devices makes it obvious that we’re also creating more opportunities to lose that data – so that increase is understandable. But we still can take steps to try to reduce the frequency of data loss despite the increase in volumes and devices.

It seems now is a great time for a reminder about the steps needed to keep your data safe. The following five recommendations are designed to help you negotiate the modern risks to your data given today’s habits of data use and the ever-evolving threats that lurk online.

Celebrating Advanced Tech and the Differentiation Paradox at CloudFest 2019

There’s no doubt businesses increasingly view the cloud as an agile, efficient way to manage their IT needs: 58 percent are moving toward a hybrid IT environment and another 18 percent are looking to move completely to the cloud (per 451 Research). This means that managed service providers (MSPs) need the right tools to stay in the game – and ahead of the competition – to facilitate this process for customers and capture some of the projected $186.4 billion cloud computing market.

Next week at CloudFest 2019, Acronis will join 7,000 global cloud, hosting, and service provider industry pros to share IT solutions that enable MSPs to solve pressing, complex customer problems. Here’s a preview of what will be top-of-mind at Acronis’ CloudFest booth #F04.

Acronis Storage

Every piece of data is required to be stored somewhere. We all know about hard drives, optical discs, tapes and other means of storage. But cloud storage and software-defined storage are the two modern methods of storing data, especially when we talk about large volumes. Acronis entered Software-Defined Storage (SDS) market in 2016, pioneering it with Blockchain based data verification. Acronis Storage is an SDS solution that allows service providers and end-users to quickly and easily transform heterogeneous hardware into protected, enterprise-grade, scalable storage to improve your total cost of ownership.

What Is Blockchain and What Does It Mean for Data Protection?

Blockchain is a technology that underpins the success of Bitcoin and other digital currencies. Wall Street is particularly interested in blockchain: The elimination of manual processes around reconciliation with customers, trading partners, and securities exchanges using blockchain is projected to save banks nearly $20 billion annually by 2022.

Blockchain has uses beyond financial transactions to improve the security and efficiencies of a range of business activities such as applications requiring transparency on data and documents with a permanent time and date stamp. In insurance, for example, blockchain technology can be used for customer onboarding, smart contracts, and fraud detection. In manufacturing, blockchain is being used in supply chain applications and 3D printing.

To better understand blockchain, let’s first look at why blockchain is so important and how it ensures the integrity and efficiency of the Bitcoin network. Then, we will look at how Acronis provides a solution that uses blockchain to record and protect the authenticity of your business assets.

Universal Software-Defined Storage (SDS) – A Better Way to Manage Your Storage Infrastructure

What is SDS? So, just what we need, another acronym.  Right? But what we do need is a way to manage storage software separately from the underlying hardware. That’s SDS — Software Defined Storage.  

It’s a relatively new term that is being bandied about a lot lately, and not everyone uses it exactly the same. However, the simplest and most basic definition is that SDS decouples storage software from the hardware where data lives to achieve continuous availability, faster performance, higher efficiency, unlimited scalability, and reduced costs.