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The Trump-Kim Summit missed addressing cyber warfare

Now that the U.S. and North Korean officials have left Singapore, the pundits are debating the effectiveness of the recent nuclear weapons summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean Chairman Kim Jong-un. Yet despite the multiple areas of concern covered during the summit, there’s one security topic that wasn’t addressed by either side – cyber warfare.

In fact, just three days after the summit, North Korea was again accused of launching a new attack as the Typeframe malware strain was uncovered.

Given our role as a global leader in cyber protection, Acronis was hopeful that the negotiations would address these concerns. The experts at Acronis’ Singaporean Security Research Centre consider cyber warfare an unfortunate omission from these talks.

Cloud backup saves data from natural disasters

Whether it’s lava flowing through the streets of Hilo, Hawaii or Storm Alberto flooding the southeastern United States, the dramatic footage of the past week captures more than the devastating power of nature – we’re seeing the loss of homes and businesses. When families and business owners are forced to evacuate, they must quickly decide which physical items to bring with them.

From family pictures to payroll records, a backup can provide critical consolation that not all will be lost, no matter how chaotic and terrifying the disaster.

Deleting my Facebook account

While most people understood that they were giving up some privacy by being on the platform, few realized the digging went that deep. As a result, there’s been a groundswell of people – celebrities and non-celebrities – joining the #DeleteFacebook campaign.

If you want to know how to delete your Facebook account – or are considering taking a break until you are satisfied the company has addressed users’ privacy concerns – there are a few things you should consider.

The true cost of ransomware is more than you think

Ransomware is no longer breaking news for consumers and companies. Large-scale infections like WannaCry and NotPetya were widely covered in the news last year.

Similarly, the damage caused by ransomware should no longer be a surprise either, with totals growing at an alarming speed. In 2015 ransomware damages totaled around $300 million, but it topped $5 billion last year and is expected to reach $11.5 billion by the end of next year.

We take a look at what the true cost of ransomware is.

World Backup Day 2018 - Survey Results

As the end of March approaches, it means World Backup Day is near – the annual reminder that if we don’t want to look the fool after data loss, we need to create secure backups.

Acronis conducts a global consumer survey each year leading up to the World Backup Day celebration, to gauge the attitudes, habits and knowledge of the general public. The findings were both eye-opening and contradictory.

Atlanta ransomware attack

Late Thursday, Atlanta, Georgia was hit by a ransomware attack that ended up infecting multiple applications and devices, crippling the city’s municipal computer system. As city employees arrived at work on Friday, they were each handed a flyer telling them not to turn on their computer until the IT department had cleared their systems.

In the meantime, cybercriminals were demanding $51,000 in bitcoin to return access to the ATL.

The Atlanta attack is just the latest high-profile ransomware attack that should prompt everyone to review their data protection strategy – because given how fast the threat from ransomware is evolving, old defenses are proving less effective against the new threats.

Black Ruby: Combining Ransomware and Coin Miner Malware

Black Ruby Ransomware and Coin Miner

In the midst of all the news and hype surrounding cryptocurrency, we’ve seen several coin miner malware programs popping into the wild, infecting a number of computers on the internet. There’s been an upsurge in coin miner malware that victimizes individual PCs and businesses using the same techniques and exploits that were previously attributed to distributed ransomware. With all this happening, the cybersecurity industry started speculating that there is a shift from ransomware to coin miners as the preferred choice of payload for cybercriminals.

Interestingly, we found a new ransomware called Black Ruby that adds coin mining as a module on top of its ransomware capabilities.

SpriteCoin Ransomware

The new SpriteCoin ransomware (also known as MoneroPay) leverages a novel social engineering technique – posing as a new cryptocurrency called SpriteCoin. It packs a one-two punch as well, combining a cryptolocker and password stealer in a single application.

The link to the SpriteCoin homepage was published on the bitcointalk.org forum and spread among users interested in new cryptocurrencies. The topic was removed when its malicious nature was revealed, but let’s take a look at the details.

Rapid Ransomware

The Rapid ransomware variant began attacking victims at the end of December 2017, according to the ID ransomware service Malwarehunterteam. This ransomware strain is interesting and unique because it keeps running even after encryption is completed, and continues encrypting files once they are created. Our team analyzed a new sample that was compiled a week ago.

GlobeImposter ransomware

On December 26, 2017, the Necurs botnet delivered a late Christmas gift – the new version of GlobeImposter ransomware. Attached to spam messages as zip archives, the zip archive contains a JavaScript that downloads and installs ransomware on a victim’s computer.