anti-ransomware software

Acronis Cyber Protect Cloud Delivers 100% Detection Rate, Zero False Alarms

AV-Test, the leading security institute known for putting anti-malware solutions through their paces, recently completed its examination of Acronis Cyber Protect Cloud – our new cyber protection product being released later this month, which delivers a unique integration of backup with full-stack next-generation anti-malware protection and comprehensive endpoint management tools.

The results are in from AV-Test and Acronis Cyber Protect Cloud performed tremendously well.

Ryuk Ransomware Strikes Again

Ryuk ransomware continues to wreak havoc – and one U.S. state in particular recently suffered from another successful attack that likely could have been prevented.

Several school districts and government offices in Louisiana were hit by an attack this summer. Unfortunately, the story was just repeated as several state agencies fell victim to another attack on November 18. In this case, the cyberattack shut down systems in the governor’s office, the Department of Motor Vehicles, the Department of Health, and The Department of Children and Family Services.

Mozy customers want more than Carbonite

When Carbonite acquired Mozy for $145 million more than a year ago, the news understandably spooked many long-time Mozy customers and service provider partners. What would happen to their data? Would their costs increase? What kind of support could they expect?

Carbonite made a good show of trying to ease concerns, but communications were apparently less than ideal. Many Mozy users were surprised when Carbonite started being installed on their systems – and based on the reports we’ve been hearing from users and our managed service provider (MSPs) partners, the migration experience has not been smooth.

Since their backup solution is going to change regardless, now is a perfect time for former Mozy users to consider alternatives like Acronis, which offers several advantages over Carbonite.

Just released - Acronis True Image 2020

They say that the only constant in life is change. That’s never been more apparent than in today’s digital world, where the amount of data we generate grows exponentially, hackers use cutting-edge technology to make their attacks more effective, and individuals spend more on multiple services and solutions to protect and defend our personal data.

In our ongoing mission to protect all data, applications, and systems – wherever they are found – today we’ve released Acronis True Image 2020, the new version of our award-winning personal cyber protection solution. With more than 100 enhancements designed to improve its performance and multiple new features that provide greater protection and control, this new release delivers everything an individual needs to ensure they never lose another file.

Buran Ransomware uses RIG Exploit Kit

Buran is a new version of the Vega ransomware strain (a.k.a. Jamper, Ghost, Buhtrap) that attacked accountants from February through April 2019. The new Buran ransomware first was discovered in June 2019.

What’s interesting is that this cryptolockers’ code was written in Object Pascal in Delphi IDE – a programming language that was popular in Latin American and former Soviet Union countries around two decades ago when it was being taught in colleges and technical universities.

Let’s take a close look at this ransomware to find out the installation process, communication details, and encryption model.

Louisiana Ransomware Attack Prompts A Statewide Emergency

A wave of ransomware attacks on public schools in the southern US state of Louisiana has prompted an unusual response, as the governor declared an official emergency to kick-start a coordinated response by several state-level law-enforcement and technology agencies.

This latest ransomware attack, which locks up the data on computer systems and only provides the key to free up the data if the victim pays an online ransom, continues a global wave of similar attacks that lately has targeted municipal governments as well as the healthcare and manufacturing industries.

Ransomware Attack Costs .5 Million in Riviera Beach, FL

Ransomware continues to be a nightmare for individuals and businesses worldwide – but in the U.S., municipal government offices increasingly seem to be the target of choice for cybercriminals.

The city of Riviera Beach, Florida made news recently when it announced it was paying approximately $600,000 in ransom to undo a ransomware attack it suffered in late May. In addition to the ransom paid, officials also invested more than $900,000 into new hardware in the hopes that they do not have the same vulnerabilities as the old ones.

That’s $1.5 million in damages from one attack.

Unfortunately, it sounds like city officials could have avoided making this payment and additional investment if they had followed some basic data protection strategies.

GandCrab ransomware is ending after stealing millions

They say crime doesn’t pay, but clearly the architects behind GandCrab ransomware didn’t get that memo. They recently announced they were retiring thanks to the money they’ve made encrypting victims’ computers.

At the beginning of June, operators of the notorious GandCrab strain of ransomware announced that “all good things come to an end” and they are ceasing their operations.

Unfortunately the success they reported will likely provide a roadmap for other cybercriminals that will continue for a long time.

Ransomware takes down airplane parts manufacturer ASCO

Another of the world’s major manufacturers was laid low recently by a ransomware attack. Production at ASCO, the giant Belgian airplane parts maker, has been halted for over a week with no end in sight. Nearly 1,000 employees have been sent home on paid leave while the company struggles to restore critical systems frozen by the malware assault.

Unfortunately, the fate of ASCO has been shared by many organizations that are ill-prepared to combat the world’s deadliest malware threat. The incident reflects a number of major trends in the ongoing struggle between cybercriminals and their targets in the public and private sector.

Cities and government agencies are under attack from RobbinHood

Ransomware continues its reign as one of the most pervasive malware threats to assail businesses, government institutions and consumers in 2019, with new variants appearing almost daily. One particularly nasty new strain of ransomware, dubbed RobbinHood, recently locked up critical IT systems and brought down corresponding public services in two North American cities: Greenville, NC and Baltimore, MD.

Government intelligence organizations confirm a recent trend of ransomware gangsters actively targeting regional and local governments as easy pickings. That’s because cities, counties and states are more likely to pay large extortion fees quickly to unlock their data and get constituent services back online with as little downtime as possible.