anti-ransomware

Just released - Acronis True Image 2020

They say that the only constant in life is change. That’s never been more apparent than in today’s digital world, where the amount of data we generate grows exponentially, hackers use cutting-edge technology to make their attacks more effective, and individuals spend more on multiple services and solutions to protect and defend our personal data.

In our ongoing mission to protect all data, applications, and systems – wherever they are found – today we’ve released Acronis True Image 2020, the new version of our award-winning personal cyber protection solution. With more than 100 enhancements designed to improve its performance and multiple new features that provide greater protection and control, this new release delivers everything an individual needs to ensure they never lose another file.

Ransomware takes down airplane parts manufacturer ASCO

Another of the world’s major manufacturers was laid low recently by a ransomware attack. Production at ASCO, the giant Belgian airplane parts maker, has been halted for over a week with no end in sight. Nearly 1,000 employees have been sent home on paid leave while the company struggles to restore critical systems frozen by the malware assault.

Unfortunately, the fate of ASCO has been shared by many organizations that are ill-prepared to combat the world’s deadliest malware threat. The incident reflects a number of major trends in the ongoing struggle between cybercriminals and their targets in the public and private sector.

Cities and government agencies are under attack from RobbinHood

Ransomware continues its reign as one of the most pervasive malware threats to assail businesses, government institutions and consumers in 2019, with new variants appearing almost daily. One particularly nasty new strain of ransomware, dubbed RobbinHood, recently locked up critical IT systems and brought down corresponding public services in two North American cities: Greenville, NC and Baltimore, MD.

Government intelligence organizations confirm a recent trend of ransomware gangsters actively targeting regional and local governments as easy pickings. That’s because cities, counties and states are more likely to pay large extortion fees quickly to unlock their data and get constituent services back online with as little downtime as possible.

WhatsApp gets hacked by spyware

Time to update. WhatsApp, one of the world’s most popular messaging apps, is racing to close a security flaw that could give hackers access to sensitive personal data and real-time communications.

This particular type of attack is dangerous because the spyware is activated regardless of whether or not WhatsApp users answer the call. Once infected, attackers can access, modify, and sell all the personal data stored on your phone or take over control of the microphone and camera. 

Here's the latest and a few tips that will help minimize the threat in the future.

Trends from Four Years of Acronis World Backup Day Survey

Every year Acronis celebrates World Backup Day with special deals, discussions, and global surveys of data protection habits, experiences, and concerns. While these celebrations evolve year-to-year to reflect the changing landscape of cyber protection, Acronis’ World Backup Day Survey includes many points that are tracked each year.

Responses to these annual questions offer a fascinating look into how consumers have valued and protected what matters on their devices over time.

World Backup Day 2019 Survey Results

As World Backup Day 2019 approaches this Sunday, the results of Acronis’ global annual survey regarding the public’s knowledge and habits of data protection are in – and with 65 percent of consumers reporting data loss by themselves or their family members, it looks like 2018 was a particularly dangerous year.

In addition, as CEOs and other C-level executives increasingly lose their jobs following data incidents, the 2019 survey also marked the first time we’ve polled business professionals regarding their knowledge and data protection habits as well.

The findings of this year’s World Backup Day Survey reveal some notable contradictions between consumer beliefs and practical choices, as well as an interesting contrast between the value people and businesses place on their data’s value and the steps they take to protect it.

CEOs can lose their job over IT issues

Nearly every week during the past few years has featured a headline about the latest data breach, malware attack, ransomware demand, or unrecoverable corporate data loss. Those stories are frequently followed by news that the CEOs at those high-profile companies were forced to resign.

Security concerns have become a critical business problem, yet they are still handled as a technical problem – mainly by IT departments. Thankfully, many organizations have started bringing together IT executives and non-IT leadership together to reshape their approach towards security concerns.

CEOs need to know what they should worry about when it comes to protecting the company’s data against cybercriminals and malware – and there are plenty of high-profile examples they can learn from.

Hard Lessons from the Catastrophic Attack on VFEmail.com

Imagine yourself as a service provider who wakes up one day, pours a cup of coffee, and checks email, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter – only to discover a flurry of panicky messages from customers about your service being unavailable. You rush to your management console to find that nothing is working; your entire operating environment is an unresponsive black hole. Racing to your data center, you discover a faceless attacker has wiped out every bit of data you own and maintain on behalf of your customers, erasing every hard drive on the premises.

What’s worse is they have also managed to destroy your backup servers. You have no recovery options.

That’s not an imaginary worst-case scenario. That’s what happened earlier this week to VFEmail.net, a US-based provider of secure email services.

https://www.acronis.com/en-us/cyber-protection/Outdated software is the weak link in your data protection

New computers and software can be expensive. If you're using your laptop for your child's homework assignments or keeping your fledgling small business going, you might be tempted to not update your device or software that often. After all, it’s getting the job done, and as the saying goes, “If it’s ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

A lot of people think this way. A recent report found that most people in 2018 are using computers that are on average six years old. Only 2.54 percent of users have a machine purchased in 2017, and nearly 75 percent of users who own a device bought it in 2011 or earlier.

The problem with relying on an older computer is that updating to newer software – from apps to operating systems – can become more difficult. More importantly, relying on outdated operating systems, file- and print-sharing utilities, and applications can expose your computer and all the data you keep on it to tremendous risks.

Cyber Insurance, Cyber Warfare, and Modern IT Needs

https://www.acronis.com/en-us/cyber-protection/Insurance company cites act-of-war to deny ransomware damages claim

You purchased cyber insurance to protect your business, just like you bought health insurance to protect yourself and your family. However, in the same way that health insurance can deny a procedure or medication, cyber insurers may deny your claims for business disruption arising from cyberattacks. 

Security professionals talk about cybercrime as though it’s a war, an ongoing battle against malicious actors. Apparently, insurance companies now agree.