Backup

The Five Stages of Data Loss

In 1969, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross documented the five stages of grief that a person goes through when faced with death. I also have spent long hours researching the stages of loss, be as it may, for data and unfortunately, I forgot to document it. However, based on the stories I’ve heard from friends, I have concluded that data loss is rather similar to Ms Kübler-Ross’ observations. The stages are remembered by the acronym DABDA for denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance. And here is how they relate to backup.

 

4 and a Half Tips for the Best Cyber Week Shopping

I know you’ve been waiting for this. You barely slept in August, could hardly eat in September and didn’t really go out in November. And now it’s here and you are a little bit scared. What if everything doesn’t go as planned? Don’t worry, I’ve got you covered. Just follow my 4 and a half tips to maximize your Cyber Week Shopping experience and enjoy.

 

1. Get Prepared

This basically means do your research and stay organized. The ideal scenario is to make a list of the online retailers that are having sales during Cyber Week. The less than ideal scenario is scrambling for 3 minutes, Googling stuff that you wanted 5 minutes before Cyber Week ends. 

 

2. Get your holiday wish list

In this modern computing world with multitudes of trends and innovations, we sometimes find ourselves lost in between new technologies, terminologies and words. Why do we tend to make things more difficult than they have to be? This was my thought when I started a set of blog posts simply describing new computing trends. Here is another trend that I would like to simplify – Data Protection.

Data Protection is the process of copying a file, folder or volume on a storage device for the purpose of recovery in case the original data is accidentally erased, damaged or destroyed. You might know this process under different name which is much easier to remember, that name is Backup.

Is There Ever a “Right” Time for an Outage?

Like many of you, I regularly read the tech press. And one thing that always interests me is outages. Being a Fellow here at Acronis, I am especially interested in outages that could have either easily been avoided or remediated rapidly. Most people in the tech industry were aware of the recent Amazon outage. But I was much more interested in the 18-minute Google Mail outage that happened two weeks before Christmas. To make a long story short, Google rolled out a routine load balancer update. There are fail safes and monitors, but stuff happens and the sequence was: 0845PT apply the patch, 0906 see the problem, 0913 revert the update, 0916 all back to normal. 

Five Changes in Backup and Recovery You'll See Happen this Year

Thanks to all the beautiful minds, a revolution in IT happens about once in every decade, leading to a major shift in nearly every area, including backup and recovery. Old and once mighty kings go away and dinosaurs die as they can no longer adapt to new conditions. We’re lucky to live in a time when so many breakthrough changes are happening at once: from explosive growth of Internet bandwidth and storage capacities, to global adoption of mobile devices, virtualization and cloud. In 2013 we will finally start to see huge effects of this mix. 

Here are five changes in backup and recovery you’ll see happen this year:

Make the Most of Your IT Budget in Q4

Welcome to the fourth quarter, the time when most IT departments are working hard to tie up loose ends and complete projects before the end of the fiscal year. Economic conditions have caused organizations to do more with less. They are tasked with protecting a growing amount of mission-critical data, often with a shrinking budget.

Now is the time to review and adjust your current technology budget, to make room for investing in new services and new technology. It’s also the time of year when you’ll want to spend any remaining 2012 budget. Failing to do so may result in your budget getting reallocated in 2013. The clock is ticking, so make the most of your 2012 budget in the last quarter. Learn some best practices for technology budgeting:

How to Avoid Hardware/ Software Drift

I’ve been writing about the hidden hazards of do-it-yourself disaster recovery. One of these hazards is hardware/software drift. Since your disaster recovery site represents a working replica of the production environment, it will need to be maintained on an ongoing basis. There are several strategies for how hardware and software are provisioned for your DR site. The strategies you choose will determine the how much maintenance will be needed to keep your DR site running at an optimal level.

There are two main techniques for acquiring hardware for a disaster recovery site, although you may want to use a combination of both. One technique is to replace hardware (i.e. a server) that is no longer covered by warranty with new hardware and use the old hardware for disaster recovery. Another strategy is to buy or lease new equipment to use at the DR site.