business backup

British Airways Hit with GDPR Fine

The kaboom you heard earlier this week was the United Kingdom’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO)  laying the hammer on British Airways in the form of a ₤183.39 M ($230M) fine for its failure to prevent a 2018 data breach that disclosed sensitive data on over half a million BA customers.

It’s exactly the kind of disaster that BA could have avoided had it heeded our advice early last year: “Get moving fast to improve cyber protection and privacy for your customers’ sensitive data. It won’t be long before national regulatory agencies start levying massive fines on well-known companies that fail to do so.

Ransomware Attack Costs .5 Million in Riviera Beach, FL

Ransomware continues to be a nightmare for individuals and businesses worldwide – but in the U.S., municipal government offices increasingly seem to be the target of choice for cybercriminals.

The city of Riviera Beach, Florida made news recently when it announced it was paying approximately $600,000 in ransom to undo a ransomware attack it suffered in late May. In addition to the ransom paid, officials also invested more than $900,000 into new hardware in the hopes that they do not have the same vulnerabilities as the old ones.

That’s $1.5 million in damages from one attack.

Unfortunately, it sounds like city officials could have avoided making this payment and additional investment if they had followed some basic data protection strategies.

Is your organization CyberFit

News of security breaches, data loss, and data theft is sadly a daily occurrence. Almost every industry and every size of organization have been hit — including governments, retailers, universities, and healthcare systems. What’s worse, affected businesses suffer both financial and reputational losses while being dragged into the news cycles.

It’s clear that organizations and employees are not CyberFit enough to meet today’s data security and privacy challenges. Let’s look at how the landscape has changed and what organizations need to do to become CyberFit.

Ransomware takes down airplane parts manufacturer ASCO

Another of the world’s major manufacturers was laid low recently by a ransomware attack. Production at ASCO, the giant Belgian airplane parts maker, has been halted for over a week with no end in sight. Nearly 1,000 employees have been sent home on paid leave while the company struggles to restore critical systems frozen by the malware assault.

Unfortunately, the fate of ASCO has been shared by many organizations that are ill-prepared to combat the world’s deadliest malware threat. The incident reflects a number of major trends in the ongoing struggle between cybercriminals and their targets in the public and private sector.

Subscriptions vs Perpetual Licenses

Everyone knows that change can be difficult. From minor things like always eating the same food to serious examples like staying at a bad job, our comfort zone makes it difficult to try new things – even when we know the change will be good for us in the long run.

The same is true in the software industry, where companies increasingly are replacing the one-time-purchase license for their product with cloud-based subscriptions. And while some customers might prefer buying a box and keeping the installation CD on the shelf, the benefits users gain from subscriptions are driving the subscription revolution. 

We thought we’d take a look at the differences between traditional one-time purchases (called perpetual licenses) and subscriptions, so you can decide which approach fits your company’s needs when looking at a solution.

Five Simple Steps to Better Backups

Five Simple Steps for Better Backups

We might only be a few days removed from World Backup Day 2019, but the idea that 65% of consumers confirmed they suffered data loss (as revealed in our annual survey of attitudes and habits about data protection) has been rolling around in my head ever since. After all, that’s nearly 30% more people who reported they or a family member lost data in 2018 – a significant jump.

The fact we all use more data and we’re accessing that data on more devices makes it obvious that we’re also creating more opportunities to lose that data – so that increase is understandable. But we still can take steps to try to reduce the frequency of data loss despite the increase in volumes and devices.

It seems now is a great time for a reminder about the steps needed to keep your data safe. The following five recommendations are designed to help you negotiate the modern risks to your data given today’s habits of data use and the ever-evolving threats that lurk online.

World Backup Day 2019 Survey Results

As World Backup Day 2019 approaches this Sunday, the results of Acronis’ global annual survey regarding the public’s knowledge and habits of data protection are in – and with 65 percent of consumers reporting data loss by themselves or their family members, it looks like 2018 was a particularly dangerous year.

In addition, as CEOs and other C-level executives increasingly lose their jobs following data incidents, the 2019 survey also marked the first time we’ve polled business professionals regarding their knowledge and data protection habits as well.

The findings of this year’s World Backup Day Survey reveal some notable contradictions between consumer beliefs and practical choices, as well as an interesting contrast between the value people and businesses place on their data’s value and the steps they take to protect it.

CEOs can lose their job over IT issues

Nearly every week during the past few years has featured a headline about the latest data breach, malware attack, ransomware demand, or unrecoverable corporate data loss. Those stories are frequently followed by news that the CEOs at those high-profile companies were forced to resign.

Security concerns have become a critical business problem, yet they are still handled as a technical problem – mainly by IT departments. Thankfully, many organizations have started bringing together IT executives and non-IT leadership together to reshape their approach towards security concerns.

CEOs need to know what they should worry about when it comes to protecting the company’s data against cybercriminals and malware – and there are plenty of high-profile examples they can learn from.

Back up before your company updates Windows 10

It’s been 34 years since Microsoft released the first version of Windows and changed the way business computing is done. Today, the tech giant’s flagship software remains the leading operating system for businesses of all sizes, owning 75 to 86 percent of the total operating system market.

One reason for this success is the way Microsoft approaches operating system updates, making it easy for businesses to get regular improvements that fix reported bugs, close security vulnerabilities, enhance performance, and ensure data protection compliance – without straining in-house IT teams.

But Windows 10 updates have a history of problems. Backing up before you start the process ensures you won’t lose time or money if your company's Windows 10 update fails.

Hard Lessons from the Catastrophic Attack on VFEmail.com

Imagine yourself as a service provider who wakes up one day, pours a cup of coffee, and checks email, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter – only to discover a flurry of panicky messages from customers about your service being unavailable. You rush to your management console to find that nothing is working; your entire operating environment is an unresponsive black hole. Racing to your data center, you discover a faceless attacker has wiped out every bit of data you own and maintain on behalf of your customers, erasing every hard drive on the premises.

What’s worse is they have also managed to destroy your backup servers. You have no recovery options.

That’s not an imaginary worst-case scenario. That’s what happened earlier this week to VFEmail.net, a US-based provider of secure email services.