Business Continuity

CEOs can lose their job over IT issues

Nearly every week during the past few years has featured a headline about the latest data breach, malware attack, ransomware demand, or unrecoverable corporate data loss. Those stories are frequently followed by news that the CEOs at those high-profile companies were forced to resign.

Security concerns have become a critical business problem, yet they are still handled as a technical problem – mainly by IT departments. Thankfully, many organizations have started bringing together IT executives and non-IT leadership together to reshape their approach towards security concerns.

CEOs need to know what they should worry about when it comes to protecting the company’s data against cybercriminals and malware – and there are plenty of high-profile examples they can learn from.

Back up before your company updates Windows 10

It’s been 34 years since Microsoft released the first version of Windows and changed the way business computing is done. Today, the tech giant’s flagship software remains the leading operating system for businesses of all sizes, owning 75 to 86 percent of the total operating system market.

One reason for this success is the way Microsoft approaches operating system updates, making it easy for businesses to get regular improvements that fix reported bugs, close security vulnerabilities, enhance performance, and ensure data protection compliance – without straining in-house IT teams.

But Windows 10 updates have a history of problems. Backing up before you start the process ensures you won’t lose time or money if your company's Windows 10 update fails.

Hard Lessons from the Catastrophic Attack on VFEmail.com

Imagine yourself as a service provider who wakes up one day, pours a cup of coffee, and checks email, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter – only to discover a flurry of panicky messages from customers about your service being unavailable. You rush to your management console to find that nothing is working; your entire operating environment is an unresponsive black hole. Racing to your data center, you discover a faceless attacker has wiped out every bit of data you own and maintain on behalf of your customers, erasing every hard drive on the premises.

What’s worse is they have also managed to destroy your backup servers. You have no recovery options.

That’s not an imaginary worst-case scenario. That’s what happened earlier this week to VFEmail.net, a US-based provider of secure email services.

Discover award-winning business backup

Businesses are struggling to keep their digital assets safe because they are saddled with legacy backup solutions that cannot meet today’s data needs. The volume of data that companies must protect is growing at an exponential rate, while the risk from quickly evolving online threats like ransomware continues to explode.

IT professionals looking for an alternative that can keep their data safe and evolve with their changing needs might consider the solution that’s earning awards and glowing reviews from industry observers, the media, and their peers.

Business Continuity Plan

As many as 25% of businesses who lose access to their data never reopen their doors.  This startling fact means that service providers practically have a moral obligation, if not a revenue incentive, to make sure that their customers have a business continuity plan.  Even in times when total outages are not occurring, employee productivity, customer satisfaction and company reputation can be affected.

Business continuity is the process of making sure the business information services are resilient to accidental, intentional or natural disruptions to their data.  Sometimes, the business continuity issue is simply human error. Perhaps someone deletes a key file from a system which causes it to break.  Other times, device failures or even natural disasters will require the implementation of the protocols in the business continuity plan. What do you need to consider when developing a business continuity plan? Read on to find out!

Is there an ROI in IT Disaster Recovery?

In light of recent U.S. and global catastrophes, disaster recovery (DR) and business continuity are top of mind for more and more IT professionals like you. Even CIOs are asking more questions about business continuity plans and how the IT department will respond in the event of a disaster.

According to an ITIC survey, one hour of downtime can cost over $100,000. If your company is smaller, you can be at an even greater risk. An estimated 25% of small businesses do not reopen following a major disaster. If you do not have a business continuity plan, your company can quickly become a statistic.

When Customers Speak… Uncensored

So, nScaled has been acquired by Acronis, the backup company. I am sure you know that already (and if you don’t just check our page!) Great synergy together – after all, backup is key part of DR.
We’ve been busy, meeting and understanding the new organization, building the roadmap and integrating the technology, studying each other’s sales and marketing, and doing everything else companies do when they merge (kind of like people, minus sales and marketing). And sometimes, with all this routine work, the most amazing things can be lost or go un-noticed… But not today.

A meteor crashed down last Saturday in Nicaragua, exploding and creating a huge crater.
In the spirit of our industry – IT disaster recovery and business continuity – you might expect me to inform you that the meteor had hit an electrical substation near a major city, causing a fire and knocking out power for days, which in turn caused IT services disruption and revenue losses for a number of banks, retailers, manufacturing and other businesses.

In this particular case, however, none of that happened. The meteor fell in an empty area, even though still 1,000 feet away from a hotel near the country’s only international airport (Managua Sandino). So, it could have been much worse, but this time the nature has given us a pass.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/08/tech/innovation/nicaragua-meteorite/

Thoughts after a 6.1 Shaker + The 7 Rules of BCDR

The dust has almost settled after the recent “shaker” – or an earthquake in our Californian slang – gladly, this time without casualties, serious injuries, with only minor property damage. Considering the area – Napa Valley, the Wine Country, delicate wine bottles don’t tolerate earthquakes well, but the damage was mostly “sentimental”. Still, it is always a wake-up call (literally at 3:30 am), both unexpected in a sense that you never know when and where it will strike next, and totally expected here in California. Apparently there is a forecasting service already in beta, predicting it up to 10 seconds in advance.

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