Data Availability

Cloud-Enabled, Dual-Destination Backup

Data is the lifeblood of any business, and it’s growing at lightning speed year-over-year. In fact, it’s estimated that five exabytes of data are created every two days! But, as important as all this data is, could the majority of organizations honestly answer that they feel confident in the protection and constant availability of their mission-critical data? What about the company data employees store on personal devices like smartphones and tablets? Is it safe from security breaches, malware and malicious hacker attacks?

Without a comprehensive data protection strategy in place, the answer is most likely “no,” and it’s time for these organizations to start worrying.

 

In a relatively short period of time, the enterprise mobility landscape has transformed from a world where a privileged circle of Blackberry users enjoyed access to their email and calendars, to an environment where the entire corporate population can take advantage of mobile access to a wide array of enterprise resources. Many of these employees are even providing their own smartphones or tablets, and are paying for their monthly service. Allowing these devices to be used to streamline tasks and enhance productivity is to the advantage of everyone.

 

Linux Backup Doesn’t Have to be Retro

Linux backup is stuck in the 90s. And like most long-term Linux users, I didn't realize that - until I started to work for a software company that performs backup and recovery and saw the alternative. At first glance, the backup software situation for Linux actually looks comfortable: Most Linux distributions include a number of Open Source backup solutions, either included in the core OS or available as an add-on. Also, many commercial backup vendors do support backup of Linux machines, so there is plenty of choice. 

In practice, however, it turns out that most of the simple free tools that are included in the distributions are not exceptionally user friendly. The tools in this category, such as Duplicity (with its several UI frontends), FWBackups or BackupPC are relatively easy to set up, and reliably get the job done to back up a user's files. But when it comes to browsing the backup and restoring the data, things often get ugly. Also, their

Backups and Business Continuity: Cavemen Were on to Something

The idea of a “backup” has been in place since man first started cherishing things that they valued. A smart caveman that loved a certain spear probably made an attempt to reproduce that in case it was to break. Since then we have changed a little, and there have been carbon copies, punch card backups, tape backups, etc. And for as long as electronic backups have been around, there have been relatively few major revolutions. Okay, sure, you can argue tapes, replication, virtualization, cloud and Big Data have all made people think about how they will back up the hybrid technologies. And every time a Sandy-like storm or major incident occurs, there’s always a sense of heightened awareness around backups and business continuity. But awareness doesn’t restore the data. I always love to hear about the people (and subsequent companies) that know that if they suffer a major data loss, they would be dead in the water, but still don’t change their habits after close calls.

I Don’t Care How it Works, I Just Want My Data!

My friend, Alexy, just reminded me how easy it is to solve problems when you have a lot of tools at hand. The specific problem of the moment is how to back up data when you are always on the go. You may not want to use a traditional backup/recovery product because you may not always have external drives or networks available, and you may travel to so many time zones that you never know when to schedule the backups. Yes, if you remember, you plug in a USB drive and copy files to it, but sometimes you do not have the time to do that – you might just have a few quick minutes in Starbucks.