data backup

Weekly Tech Roundup — February 27, 2017

When it comes to cyber threats, the future is here—malware attacking new devices in new ways and jumping on popular technology trends to do it. Phones aren’t safe, computers aren’t safe, and in some instances, it doesn’t even take clicking on the wrong link or attachment to become a victim of an attack. Keeping up with these threats is becoming a full-time job, and it’s imperative that we do whatever it takes to keep our data safe.

With each week looking slightly different from the last, what tech headlines did you miss?

Weekly Tech Roundup — February 20

It’s becoming apparent that our dedication to data protection needs to become more resolute. We need to be smarter when it comes to our data, because cybercriminals are certainly getting sneakier. We’ve seen first-hand how innovative ransomware can be, and research shows that it’s only going to get worse—doing more damage and causing more harm. Malware is taking advantage of existing vulnerabilities and if we don’t start upping our security game, our data will be increasingly at risk. What threats are headed your way? Last week’s biggest tech headlines say it all.

Weekly Tech Roundup — February 13

As the weeks roll on, ransomware continues to dominate most cyber security headlines. But it wasn’t just stories of data loss and malware attacks that made the front page. Hackers continued to take advantage of the growing number of data vulnerabilities that permeate our digital world today—but some of them took it upon themselves to fight fire with fire, exposing some particularly harmful websites to the kind of attack they themselves perpetuate.

This week’s tech roundup is full of stories that detail the horrors of cyber-attacks. What did you miss?

Weekly Tech Roundup— February 6

Disaster struck last week, and the victims ranged from everyday users to large organizations. Valuable data was lost, operations were shut down, and some people were even affected physically after a ransomware attack took control of the electronic locking systems at an Austrian hotel.

This week’s tech roundup is full of stories that detail the horrors of failed data protection. What did you miss?

Weekly Tech Roundup: January 30

Weekly Tech Roundup: January 30

In a world of increasing cyber attacks and data vulnerability, it’s our responsibility to take action and protect ourselves—even though, at times, it seems ever more difficult. Internet of Things (IoT) devices are flooding the market, becoming a major part of our daily lives; ransomware is preying upon innocent individuals and institutions in the hopes of making a quick buck; and dormant threats are coming out of the cracks, striking fear into those looking towards the future. But even with all of these threats, we continue to innovate, finding new and imaginative ways to protect ourselves and our devices.

This week in tech saw new ways of thinking about security to combat old yet increasingly devious threats. What did you miss?

Weekly Tech Roundup: January 23

Weekly Tech Roundup: January 23

With much of the news revolving around the inauguration of President Donald Trump, it might have been easy to miss the revelations in the world of cybersecurity. A number of new, and old, malware variants were exposed, and the tech world began doing more to protect themselves against attack. With these revelations came new products ready to fight against ransomware, putting data protection at the forefront of cybersecurity.

The headlines were endless, but we made it our mission to gather the most relevant and most intriguing, topics of discussion. What did you miss?

The Stranger in the Photograph

The Stranger in the Photograph

Many years ago, I purchased a black paper album at an estate sale. It contained images of a beautiful woman—her loose high school picture fell to the floor the first time I opened the album’s cover. Her smile grabbed me and her warm expression seemed to invite me into her life. I flipped past her wedding picture, a photo of a baby in her arms with a proud husband by her side, and a series of group photos.

The images from the mid-20th century told the story of a good life that at first made me happy, like I was a guest in a comfortable home. However, the reality of the moment soon hit. To me, this woman was really just a nameless face in print; she was left for a stranger to find in a box in a basement. She now seemed abandoned. Lost. Forgotten.

Windows Server 2003 - How to wind down safely and avoid data loss

Since its launch on May 28, 2003, Windows Server 2003 has become the backbone of many data center operations. More than twenty million servers worldwide still use Windows Server 2003. According to W3Techs, 25 percent of the Windows-based web servers still run IIS 6.0, running on Windows Server 2003. Now after 12 years, Microsoft has said it will discontinue Windows Server 2003 support on July 14, 2015.

In 2014 alone, Microsoft released 67 security bulletins for Windows Server 2003, deeming 27 of them ‘critical’. As with Windows XP, governments and large corporations can pay Microsoft millions of dollars for out-of-band support. If your organization cannot afford the high cost of extended support, it is time to move away from Windows Server 2003. There are six reasons why you should migrate from Windows Server 2003:

Safely Migrating Server Workloads

By Frank Jablonski

Most businesses have physical servers, virtual machines, or a combination of both supporting production operations.  These organizations also have a variety of production workloads such as Microsoft® Exchange for email, SharePoint® for collaboration and content management, and various vendor-supplied or internally-developed applications running SQL database servers.  Workloads such as these are your company’s lifeblood, and many times, you need to migrate these workloads to different hardware or virtual machines (VMs).

Not too long ago (even 5 or 10 years seems an eternity) life was easy. Most of us were tied to our desks. The ones that were not, like sales people, would carry boxes with printed materials and price lists in the trunks of their cars. Remote workers would dial in and connect via VPN to access their file servers.

Things are different now. Mobility is changing the way we do business. We work wherever we are, at the office, at home, on a plane, at a client’s site, out in the field. We are mobile. We use mobile devices. And all companies, large and small, benefit from this new scenario. Competitive organizations empower their users with mobility solutions maximizing their productivity to drive better service, improve customer satisfaction, and ultimately increase revenue and profitability.