data loss

Long gone are the days of the single computer household and mobile phones being a luxury item. With two little ones at home, my family has already accumulated more technology (one iPad, two mobile phones, two laptops and one desktop computer) than we know what to do with.

Plus, we task all of these devices with creating and storing enormous quantities of information that remains central to our lives – from personal photos, videos and music to important work and household documents. At the same time, all of these devices being connected to the Internet, making our digital lives more on the go than ever: nine out of ten households in the US have three or more devices connected to the Internet now.

When today's kids turn into teenagers, these “digital natives” will be integrating technology more deeply into their own lives than any other generation, and the pervasiveness of devices, all with important data on them, will only get broader.  

Since its launch on May 28, 2003, Windows Server 2003 has become the backbone of many data center operations. More than twenty million servers worldwide still use Windows Server 2003. According to W3Techs, 25 percent of the Windows-based web servers still run IIS 6.0, running on Windows Server 2003. Now after 12 years, Microsoft has said it will discontinue Windows Server 2003 support on July 14, 2015.

In 2014 alone, Microsoft released 67 security bulletins for Windows Server 2003, deeming 27 of them ‘critical’. As with Windows XP, governments and large corporations can pay Microsoft millions of dollars for out-of-band support. If your organization cannot afford the high cost of extended support, it is time to move away from Windows Server 2003. There are six reasons why you should migrate from Windows Server 2003:

When Choosing a Data Protection Technology, Remember: Flexibility Matters

To help organizations better understand the challenges of backup, disaster recovery and secure access, Acronis has created the "8 Noble Truths" of data protection. To view all 8 Noble Truths, please download the whitepaper. This is the seventh post in an eight-part series to help you protect your data:

IT departments are contending with several seismic shifts, including the rapid adoption of mobile, cloud and virtualization technologies in the workplace. But the consumerization trend, perhaps more than any other, highlights the desire among employees to use simple and flexible tools to do their work.

What the Supreme Court's Aereo Decision Could Mean for the Cloud: Weekly Roundup

With the ongoing IRS data loss scandal and the Supreme Court's ruling against cloud technology startup Aereo, it's been an eventful week for IT pros. The stories highlight the clash between disruptive technologies and the prevalence of legacy systems still common in the largest government agencies. Read on for more on these stories, and other data protection news from the Web this week: 

How the Hospitality Industry Can Overcome 3 Big Data Challenges

Hotels and other companies in the hospitality industry collect, store and manage loads of data that must be protected — for both the company's and the customer's sake. But many companies in the $593 billion hospitality industry emphasize customer service before considering IT's role in the business. The consequences from data loss, however, can be far more damaging than a bad review.

Bad news this week for the healthcare industry: According to new research, data breaches and loss cost the industry billions every year. With companies and consumers alike creating more data than ever before, backup and data protection is a must. But those aren't the only topics on IT pros' minds these days. Here's a look at a few of the IT do's and don'ts on the web this week: 

How Much Can Data Loss Cost?

The True Cost of Lost — or Nearly Lost — Data

If you’ve ever had a device crash, taking all your data with it, you know how painful the experience can be. When that happens on a large scale, the effects can be devastating. Data loss costs the average business $586,000 a year, and that doesn't address the personal, emotional and cultural costs of losing everything from financial data to great works of art. The worst part? It can easily be avoided.

Here are four real-world examples of data that was lost — or nearly lost — but could have been saved with a simple, foolproof backup plan.

The Five Stages of Data Loss

In 1969, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross documented the five stages of grief that a person goes through when faced with death. I also have spent long hours researching the stages of loss, be as it may, for data and unfortunately, I forgot to document it. However, based on the stories I’ve heard from friends, I have concluded that data loss is rather similar to Ms Kübler-Ross’ observations. The stages are remembered by the acronym DABDA for denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance. And here is how they relate to backup.