Disaster recovery

 

Acronis Data Cloud 7.8 Enhances Cyber Protection

When they first set out to build Acronis Data Cloud our engineers asked themselves: What if MSPs could work with a single data protection platform that’s easy to use, efficient and secure, which evolves with technological advances and threats to data safety alike? Certainly no small task, last year they answered that question by delivering Acronis Data Cloud, the first single, turnkey SaaS solution that delivers multiple data protection solutions in one.

Now the challenge we embrace is to continue evolving the Acronis Data Cloud platform to meet end-user customer demands. Today we are excited to announce that version 7.8 is live with more than 80 new features and improvements. Here’s a closer look at five essential enhancements that benefit end-users and help MSPs take their cloud data protection business further.

In the world of information technology, delivering cloud-based services is the next train barreling down the tracks. This ever-expanding, ever-evolving opportunity is moving at a remarkable speed (which is why there are so many aaS acronyms out there).

Even with big players like Amazon, Microsoft, Salesforce.com and Google in the mix, there’s plenty of opportunity for service providers to jump aboard.

Mark Jameson

Acronis has announced the availability of Acronis Disaster Recovery Cloud to enable our Service Provider partners to deliver disaster recovery services to their clients. You are using Acronis Backup Cloud, but you now ask yourself why should I use Acronis Disaster Recovery Cloud and how do I get started? I would like to help you answer these questions.

Business Continuity Plan

As many as 25% of businesses who lose access to their data never reopen their doors.  This startling fact means that service providers practically have a moral obligation, if not a revenue incentive, to make sure that their customers have a business continuity plan.  Even in times when total outages are not occurring, employee productivity, customer satisfaction and company reputation can be affected.

Business continuity is the process of making sure the business information services are resilient to accidental, intentional or natural disruptions to their data.  Sometimes, the business continuity issue is simply human error. Perhaps someone deletes a key file from a system which causes it to break.  Other times, device failures or even natural disasters will require the implementation of the protocols in the business continuity plan. What do you need to consider when developing a business continuity plan? Read on to find out!

Disaster Recovery as a Service — Trends 2017

Next year’s developments in the cloud and data protection space will continue reshaping the DRaaS market. Just recovering data in a different location will no longer be enough. Customers will expect their data to be portable, verifiable, and protected against all types of cyber-attacks.

Disaster at the Devil's Tower

Disaster at the Devil's Tower

“Never update your system on Friday, 13th or on Halloween”. I knew the rule, I remembered it – but decided to ignore. I went ahead and began updating a few systems on October 31. I started the procedure late and with the last-minute requests and unruly users, my day has got away. I knew the update would go late into the night.

The sun was already down, and a light rain mixed with the wind created a gloomy atmosphere outside. Dark shadows mixed with swaying trees were not for the faint of heart. Then, the sky suddenly lit up as if it was in the middle of the day! It was so unusual that I dropped everything and ran outside.

Hi, I am Mark Jameson, the General Manager of Disaster Recovery Business at Acronis.  I am a business person, not a marketing person.  So why have I decided to write a blog? Well, today I felt compelled to share my thoughts with you because something important has happened.

Why Backing Up Half of Your Hybrid Physical and Virtual Environment is Not Enough!

According to a recent Enterprise Strategy Group study, only 8% of organizations have virtualized the majority of servers that could be. Another study from Techaisle shows that only 60% of servers were virtualized in 2014, and while the figure is expected to rise, total virtualization is nowhere in sight. The same study also noted some of the major challenges of virtualization, including costs and management complexity.

Is there an ROI in IT Disaster Recovery?

In light of recent U.S. and global catastrophes, disaster recovery (DR) and business continuity are top of mind for more and more IT professionals like you. Even CIOs are asking more questions about business continuity plans and how the IT department will respond in the event of a disaster.

According to an ITIC survey, one hour of downtime can cost over $100,000. If your company is smaller, you can be at an even greater risk. An estimated 25% of small businesses do not reopen following a major disaster. If you do not have a business continuity plan, your company can quickly become a statistic.

Where to Back Up Now – Locally or in the Cloud?

Data is the lifeline of your organization. You, as an IT system administrator, know this perfectly well through the daily trials and tribulations babysitting your IT systems, through the pain and suffering of getting things back up and running when they go down. Because of this you know that backing up everything you manage is essential – and maybe you even learned this hard way.

So, what do you do?

First, you select a complete and reliable backup solution, and provision it in your environment. However, when you get to the settings of your backup policy, you are stumped by the simple question: “Where do you want to back up to?”

“Hold on. Where do I want to back up?” you ask yourself. The software gives you multiple options – disk, network, cloud, tape – but which one is the best?

Well, it can be tricky – as there is no absolute best option. For example: