Dr plan

Is there an ROI in IT Disaster Recovery?

In light of recent U.S. and global catastrophes, disaster recovery (DR) and business continuity are top of mind for more and more IT professionals like you. Even CIOs are asking more questions about business continuity plans and how the IT department will respond in the event of a disaster.

According to an ITIC survey, one hour of downtime can cost over $100,000. If your company is smaller, you can be at an even greater risk. An estimated 25% of small businesses do not reopen following a major disaster. If you do not have a business continuity plan, your company can quickly become a statistic.

Black Swan in the Data Center or How to Prepare for a Disaster

In today’s blog, I’d like to step away from the technical aspects of disaster recovery and focus on the human impact. With that in mind, I’d like to introduce you to one of my favorite books on the subject of predictability and inevitability: The Black Swan by Nassim Nicholas Taleb.

 

The book describes Black Swan events as unexpected and unpredictable. However, a person or organization can plan for negative events, and by doing so strengthen their ability to respond, as well as exploit positive events. Taleb contends in his book that people in general — and specifically within companies and enterprises — are very vulnerable to hazardous Black Swan events and can be exposed to high losses if unprepared.

 

Not if, but when!

 

Automate – Simplify your Life. Watch a 4-minute Automation Demo.

Automate, automate, automate. According to Forrester Research (The State of Business Technology Resiliency, Q2 2014), “The complexity we face today in technology is beyond what humans can manage”.

How to Avoid Hardware/ Software Drift

I’ve been writing about the hidden hazards of do-it-yourself disaster recovery. One of these hazards is hardware/software drift. Since your disaster recovery site represents a working replica of the production environment, it will need to be maintained on an ongoing basis. There are several strategies for how hardware and software are provisioned for your DR site. The strategies you choose will determine the how much maintenance will be needed to keep your DR site running at an optimal level.

There are two main techniques for acquiring hardware for a disaster recovery site, although you may want to use a combination of both. One technique is to replace hardware (i.e. a server) that is no longer covered by warranty with new hardware and use the old hardware for disaster recovery. Another strategy is to buy or lease new equipment to use at the DR site.

Five Things You need to Know to Get Raas Right, Part II

Last time, we looked at the BIG difference between backup and Disaster Recovery. Today, we’ll discuss how to prioritize what to protect, and how to deal with heterogeneous environments…

Prioritize Servers and Applications

The same mentality that leads companies to use backup and forego DR also negatively affects the way they think about prioritizing their protection requirements. Thinking about recovery in terms of which files to protect is the wrong way to go; you end up lost in the weeds and not looking at things systematically.