Remote activation power grid failure

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Automate, automate, automate. According to Forrester Research (The State of Business Technology Resiliency, Q2 2014), “The complexity we face today in technology is beyond what humans can manage”.

How to Avoid Hardware/ Software Drift

I’ve been writing about the hidden hazards of do-it-yourself disaster recovery. One of these hazards is hardware/software drift. Since your disaster recovery site represents a working replica of the production environment, it will need to be maintained on an ongoing basis. There are several strategies for how hardware and software are provisioned for your DR site. The strategies you choose will determine the how much maintenance will be needed to keep your DR site running at an optimal level.

There are two main techniques for acquiring hardware for a disaster recovery site, although you may want to use a combination of both. One technique is to replace hardware (i.e. a server) that is no longer covered by warranty with new hardware and use the old hardware for disaster recovery. Another strategy is to buy or lease new equipment to use at the DR site.

How to Choose a Remote Colocation Site

Choosing a disaster recovery location is critical to the success of any DR project. One of the biggest mistakes that you can make is to choose a colocation site that is too close to your production site. It’s way too easy for a power grid failure to knock out both your primary and your colocation site if both sites are located in the same metropolitan area. (It happens!) But the challenge of in-house DR is that the technical team responsible for bringing your DR site online will need access to that site. This means that the approach and technology used to deliver a disaster recovery solution must be capable of remote activation. Learn more about remote activation in the nScaled white paper The 5 Things That Can Go Wrong With DIY Disaster Recovery: 5 Things That Can Go Wrong With DIY DR