Remote colocation

Failed Testing: Another Hidden Hazard of DIY DR

Building a disaster recovery site can be an exciting project for ambitious IT teams. It involves a great deal of planning and results in a high degree of satisfaction once the environment is complete, the budget is justified and the equipment is procured and configured. Overall it is a gratifying experience– until it’s time to test the solution.

Designing a DR testing scenario can be a project in itself. Significant capital expense has to be justified for building the DR site and the return on investment cannot be realized until a test has been developed. Most companies will plan scheduled downtime, take production systems offline, and test the DR site with production offline. This typically involves many hours of late night and weekend work for the IT staff and for the application owners.

How to Choose a Remote Colocation Site

Choosing a disaster recovery location is critical to the success of any DR project. One of the biggest mistakes that you can make is to choose a colocation site that is too close to your production site. It’s way too easy for a power grid failure to knock out both your primary and your colocation site if both sites are located in the same metropolitan area. (It happens!) But the challenge of in-house DR is that the technical team responsible for bringing your DR site online will need access to that site. This means that the approach and technology used to deliver a disaster recovery solution must be capable of remote activation. Learn more about remote activation in the nScaled white paper The 5 Things That Can Go Wrong With DIY Disaster Recovery: 5 Things That Can Go Wrong With DIY DR