Security

Cerber Ransomware

The well known Cerber ransomware continues to be active this summer. The size of the cryptolocker varies between 244 to 292 Kbytes, with the new builds spreading via spear phishing email campaigns, targeting enterprises. The latest Cerber ransomware easily bypasses traditional defenses. The analyzed Cerber sample (MD5: cfd2d6f189b04d42618007fc9c540352) was only detected as a suspicious malicious object by nine out of 64 antiviruses on the first submission to Virustotal. The low detection rate can be explained by the fact that the cryptolocker is using a polymorphic encryptor and API call obfuscation to protect its copies from being detected by antiviruses.

 

Petya Ransomware

The new Petya-like ransomware just served a big blow to hundreds of banks, corporations, government organizations, post offices and shopping outlets around the world, spreading like fire, taking advantage of the EternalBlue exploit used by WannaCry ransomware only a few weeks before.

Petya, Petrwrap, EternalPetya — while the world is still deciding what to call this damaging ransomware worm, let’s pull it apart and see what it’s made of.

Weekly Tech Roundup — April 24

Technology News

New malware botnets, Ransomware as a Service campaigns, and financial breaches littered the technological landscape last week. But that doesn’t mean the world of tech isn’t going to fight back. Find out what’s being done to combat these emerging threats, and what you can do to protect your data in the meantime in our weekly tech roundup.

Weekly Tech Roundup — April 17

Coffee Blockchain

The good guys had some wins this week, making the digital world a little bit safer. But it seems the world needs balance—new threats popping up in the place of old ones. Luckily, the innovations weren’t all bad (have you heard about a company that is trying to transform the global coffee supply chain with blockchain?) What tech headlines did you miss last week?

Weekly Tech Roundup — April 10

This week was full of milestones, breakthroughs, and innovations. New malware was uncovered, old records were broken, and new threats emerged. Now more than ever, it’s important that to keep an eye on the technical horizon, because you never know what new ways your data could become vulnerable. What headlines did you miss?

Weekly Tech Roundup — April 3

Tech News

Last Friday was World Backup Day, and good thing it was because cybercriminals weren’t taking any time off. But it wasn’t just cybercriminals putting your data at risk. Software upgrades and even trusted government tools made hacking into your data even easier. What do you have to worry about when it comes to protecting your data this week? Find out in the stories below.

Weekly Tech Roundup — March 27

Weekly Tech Roundup — March 27

Data is everywhere and it’s valuable. Cybercriminals know it, lawmakers know it, and big corporations know it, too. With rising threats putting data in precarious positions, it’s important that you stay up-to-date on the threats that could be eyeing your information.

Weekly Tech Roundup — March 20

Weekly Tech Roundup — 20

Don’t get left in the dust — new innovations in the technical sphere could leave your data more vulnerable than before. Whether it’s because of third-party access to your accounts, outdated operating systems, or lax data storage, your information is just waiting to be hacked or leaked. Do you know what’s in store for your data?

Weekly Tech Roundup — March 13

Weekly Tech Roundup — March 13

The world is adapting to increasing cybersecurity threats, but the impact these changes will have, have only just begun. With vigilante hackers, proposed government bills, and increased rating standards, it seems like the fate of our digital data might be looking up. But with these increases in data protection and security, come sneakier techniques from cybercriminals all their own. What tech headlines did you miss?

Weekly Tech Roundup — March 6

Technology News

With malware transformations, cloud service outages, and data loss making headlines last week, it’s important that we take a step back and look at our own computer habits. New techniques give cybercriminals the ability to hack into our PCs, smartphones and IoT devices. Innovations also let them hack into our financial institutions. Are you sure that your data is safe? Find out what could put it in harm’s way.