security patches

Cyberthreat update from Acronis CPOCs: Week of July 18, 2020

Here at Acronis, we’re always monitoring for dangers to your data, deploying updates to handle newly-discovered vulnerabilities, and issuing alerts and recommendations to help you stay protected. Our global network of Acronis Cyber Protection Operations Centers (CPOCs) continue to work around the clock to proactively detect and defend against the latest cyberthreats.

Part of this work includes video updates to inform you of new hazards in the digital landscape. Here’s a look at some of the most recent breaking news and analyses.

Acronis CPOC cyberthreat updates

At Acronis, we’re constantly monitoring for dangers to your data, introducing fixes for newly-discovered vulnerabilities, and issuing alerts and recommendations to help you stay protected. The threat landscape is ever-shifting, and our global network of Acronis Cyber Protection Operations Centers (CPOCs) works round the clock to proactively detect and defend against malware, viruses, and cryptojacking.

Our work to keep you informed of hazards in the digital landscape now includes Acronis’ YouTube channel because we recently launched a new series of video updates that summarize the latest threats straight from our CPOCs.

Here’s a look at some of the recent breaking news and analysis.

Acronis acts quickly to counter MDS Vulnerabilities in Intel Processors

Last week it was revealed that certain Intel processors contain a new set of hardware vulnerabilities that enables “speculative execution attacks”. In these attacks, a malicious app or guest virtual machine gains access to the data stored inside CPU buffers – allowing hackers to bypass the security restrictions on the system.

The bad news: The researchers who found the MDS bug say it likely affects all Intel CPUs released since 2011 – and as a result, Acronis Software-Defined Infrastructure could be exposed to an attack.

The good news: As soon as the problem was identified, Acronis immediately developed a fix so your data won’t be at risk once you’ve installed the update.

https://www.acronis.com/en-us/cyber-protection/Outdated software is the weak link in your data protection

New computers and software can be expensive. If you're using your laptop for your child's homework assignments or keeping your fledgling small business going, you might be tempted to not update your device or software that often. After all, it’s getting the job done, and as the saying goes, “If it’s ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

A lot of people think this way. A recent report found that most people in 2018 are using computers that are on average six years old. Only 2.54 percent of users have a machine purchased in 2017, and nearly 75 percent of users who own a device bought it in 2011 or earlier.

The problem with relying on an older computer is that updating to newer software – from apps to operating systems – can become more difficult. More importantly, relying on outdated operating systems, file- and print-sharing utilities, and applications can expose your computer and all the data you keep on it to tremendous risks.

Windows Server 2003 - How to wind down safely and avoid data loss

Since its launch on May 28, 2003, Windows Server 2003 has become the backbone of many data center operations. More than twenty million servers worldwide still use Windows Server 2003. According to W3Techs, 25 percent of the Windows-based web servers still run IIS 6.0, running on Windows Server 2003. Now after 12 years, Microsoft has said it will discontinue Windows Server 2003 support on July 14, 2015.

In 2014 alone, Microsoft released 67 security bulletins for Windows Server 2003, deeming 27 of them ‘critical’. As with Windows XP, governments and large corporations can pay Microsoft millions of dollars for out-of-band support. If your organization cannot afford the high cost of extended support, it is time to move away from Windows Server 2003. There are six reasons why you should migrate from Windows Server 2003: