Universal restore

Back up before your company updates Windows 10

It’s been 34 years since Microsoft released the first version of Windows and changed the way business computing is done. Today, the tech giant’s flagship software remains the leading operating system for businesses of all sizes, owning 75 to 86 percent of the total operating system market.

One reason for this success is the way Microsoft approaches operating system updates, making it easy for businesses to get regular improvements that fix reported bugs, close security vulnerabilities, enhance performance, and ensure data protection compliance – without straining in-house IT teams.

But Windows 10 updates have a history of problems. Backing up before you start the process ensures you won’t lose time or money if your company's Windows 10 update fails.

Healing Data Centers with Bare-Metal Recovery

Phew. The worst is over. You have identified, caught and dealt with the virus that threw you and your bosses out of the comfort zone for days. You have shut down all the affected servers – the data center is safe.


Like a soldier returning from a mission, you are dreaming of a peaceful rebuilding of everything that was lost. However, that is not what your bosses, your colleagues, and your company demand. They need the data center and all applications back. For them, the downtime is not over. Not yet.


So what do you do? You sigh and prepare for a long routine – install operating systems on each server, service packs, updates, drivers, applications, application updates, settings, etc. You know it will take many long hours, if not days to complete – and with number of affected servers, you are facing an uphill battle. You pray for luck that everything goes smoothly, and you do not have to restart from scratch any of the servers.

We often find ourselves confused and lost in this trendy innovative computing world.  We use new words, technologies and “innovation” to make computing life much more difficult than it has to be. This was my thought when I started a set of blog posts simply describing new computing trends and technologies. Here is another technology that I would like to simplify – Migration to Dissimilar Hardware.

Something that happened to me recently and may probably happen to any car driver – the Check Engine light came on suggesting a service checkup. There are lots of things that you’d be happy to hear from the mechanic in this situation – something like “The gas cap was loose” or “The wire fell off”. But what happens if it is an overheated or seized engine, something non-repairable or imminent to fail?