Windows

Top Windows Vulnerabilities May 2020

Every month, more than a thousand software vulnerabilities get reported or updated, and May 2020 was no different. While the numbers dropped slightly compared to March and April, VulnDB registered 1,225 new vulnerabilities in May, with most of these vulnerabilities affecting the widely used family of Microsoft Windows products.

In total, Microsoft released patched for 111 vulnerabilities for various products, with 16 of the CVEs rated critical and the remaining 95 as classified as important. Adobe also released patches for 36 vulnerabilities in May.

Acronis Active Protection discovers AutoIt cryptomining campaign

The Acronis Security Team was one of the first to identify a new cryptomining campaign targeting the attrib.exe Windows process. Learn how our team detected the spike in crytomining attacks, how the AutoIt cryptomining malware works, and how Acronis Active Protection - built into Acronis cyber protection solutions - helps to keep your systems protected. 

Acronis Universal Restore

Nobody likes change. But while changing hardware can be a challenge, Acronis Universal Restore makes it simple.

That’s because when it comes to moving an existing Windows system to a new computer, Acronis Universal Restore is the tool you need. Windows systems may not boot properly when loaded on a new computer with dissimilar hardware, but Universal Restore solves that problem and makes booting the system in the new hardware environment seamless.

4 Easy Steps to Keep Your Mac Users Productive

For many marketing and creative professionals, preferred design tools are available exclusively on Macs. As a result, for these team members to deliver your web pages, online publications, print assets, and social media campaigns, they require Macs – no matter how Windows-based the rest of your IT environment is.

Yet IT professionals who work in modern, heterogeneous environments know that having multiple platforms in play can lead to inconsistent and insecure user experiences. You’ve probably heard all of the common complaints from Mac users:

Integrating Mac To Windows: What Apple Won't Tell You

If your company has a mixed environment of Windows and Macs and you've recently tried to upgrade to the latest version of Mac OS X, you have no doubt encountered frustrating incompatibility issues. Why is that? Well, perhaps Apple forgot to tell you something!

Mac OS X has always supported two network protocols: AFP (Apple Filing Protocol), which is Apple’s native file sharing protocol for Macs, and SMB (Server Messaging Block), which is the native file sharing protocol for Windows and is typically used for NAS storage.

With each OS X update, Apple has tried to improve Mac SMB compatibility. But, even with the latest SMB3 support in OS X 10.10 Yosemite, Mac users continue to report frustrating problems, especially with key applications such as Microsoft Office and Adobe Creative Suite.

In today’s business world, we need to justify every dollar that we spend, lowering costs, and delivering a return on investment on everything we do. Nowhere is this more true than in IT, where Big Data, Mobility and BYOD are changing the way we work across the globe, requiring companies to an IT depratments to invest and change to remain competitive.

Consider the following facts:

  1. More data is being generated, copied, moved, stored and kept for longer periods of time than ever before
     
  2. Demands for storage keep growing dramatically, but in general, budgets don’t follow the same curve, and don’t increase in the same proportion to keep up

Research shows that even during the recession of 2008-2009, businesses experienced an approximately 40-percent annual increase in storage demand. Now, as the economy is back on track, that growth rate is closer to 60%.

Windows Server 2003 - How to wind down safely and avoid data loss

Since its launch on May 28, 2003, Windows Server 2003 has become the backbone of many data center operations. More than twenty million servers worldwide still use Windows Server 2003. According to W3Techs, 25 percent of the Windows-based web servers still run IIS 6.0, running on Windows Server 2003. Now after 12 years, Microsoft has said it will discontinue Windows Server 2003 support on July 14, 2015.

In 2014 alone, Microsoft released 67 security bulletins for Windows Server 2003, deeming 27 of them ‘critical’. As with Windows XP, governments and large corporations can pay Microsoft millions of dollars for out-of-band support. If your organization cannot afford the high cost of extended support, it is time to move away from Windows Server 2003. There are six reasons why you should migrate from Windows Server 2003: