The nScaled Cloud Computing Console – Part 1

Over the next few days and weeks I will be introducing and detailing individual features and functionality of the nScaled Cloud Computing console via this blog series.  It’s my goal to provide more information, thoughts, options and demonstrations of how nScaled, Inc. provides business continuity to our clients.  This first post will be a general introduction to the nScaled Cloud Computing Console and a small screencast of what happens when a server starts in the nScaled cloud.

Our cloud computing console is the SaaS front end to our cloud computing platform. The console is command and control for our cloud computing platform.  It is the main interface to the nScaled cloud computing platform and infrastructure services.

At nScaled, our platform and infrastructure have been designed and deployed to apply the technical and business concepts of cloud computing to the needs of high value content creators who are intolerant to risk when it comes to their protecting their data and keeping their business running.  We call this Total Data Protection ™.  It is our job at nScaled to keep these content creators working through the good and the bad.  We take this job very seriously.

On this screen you will notice a list of servers.  These are actually potential servers that have been replicated from a client data center.  In this case, the client data center is our lab in Sausalito and the cloud computing data center the servers have been replicated to is in Dallas, TX.  The name of the server is SQL129SRV-32.  To start the server is actually quite simple.  I find the server I want, click it, choose the point in time from which I wish to start the server (the snapshot), then I click activate and confirm.  You will see this in the screencast below.

You will notice that the server was given an IP address.  When a server is replicated to the nScaled cloud and started the very first time it gets a permanent IP address.  That IP address will always be used for that server over time as long as it exists.  This is important for being able to plan for failover considerations around DNS.  All of our clients get their own private subnet from which their IP addresses are assigned.

Typically, a server in our cloud will take from 5-8 minutes to start from the time you click activate.  During this period, we are literally creating a server from scratch on our platform using the data provided during implementation and setup and we are doing this on the fly.  You are not required to use server templates or create custom templates.  This is YOUR server starting in our cloud because you need it for some reason.  So, without further ado, here is the screencast, I did cut the startup wait time out from the middle of the screencast.  Total elapsed time for this start up was 9 minutes.

That concludes this first post in this series.  If there are specific things you want to see then please let me know what you hope to learn and see and I’ll be happy to cover that.