Data Protection

IT Pros: To Protect Against 'Bit Rot,' Ask Cloud Vendors the Right Questions

Decay is a fact of life that applies to digital bits and bytes, as well as those leftovers in the shared company kitchen. When it comes to data, that decay, or "bit rot," can threaten the piles of business-critical information that IT departments increasingly trust cloud vendors to manage, store and protect. How can IT pros determine whether their cloud vendors will adequately protect data? It starts by asking the right questions.

Today, we are excited to unveil Acronis AnyData, a next generation data protection technology. Developed over the past 10 years, AnyData offers easy, complete and safe backup, disaster recovery and secure access capabilities across any and all environments and locations. 

Essentially, AnyData is one seamless system that offers the simplicity and cost-effectiveness companies need for complete data protection. The “Any” in AnyData means just that:

The advent of enterprise mobility has radically affected the way organizations conduct business. No matter whether you are talking to customers from markets as diverse as Pharma, Health, Financial, Education, Publishing, Advertising, Government, Legal, or service providers, it’s a fact that mobility is here to stay. But while it brings all kinds of benefits it also creates a new set of challenges.

Now organizations can be more productive than ever. CEOs can verify the latest contract while in the airport, researchers can work in the field and easily access all their data, and sales professionals can have access to the latest product presentations at any moment to lock in that big deal.

We’ve become far more productive and can even share synced files with teams distributed around the globe. However, this connectivity also raises flags about data security and how to prevent accidental leaks of sensitive files.

In this modern computing world with multitudes of trends and innovations, we sometimes find ourselves lost in between new technologies, terminologies and words. Why do we tend to make things more difficult than they have to be? This was my thought when I started a set of blog posts simply describing new computing trends. Here is another trend that I would like to simplify – Data Protection.

Data Protection is the process of copying a file, folder or volume on a storage device for the purpose of recovery in case the original data is accidentally erased, damaged or destroyed. You might know this process under different name which is much easier to remember, that name is Backup.

PRISM Exposes Enterprise Risks

An article in the Guardian last week revealed the U.S. government's PRISM program. The article outlined the government's alleged monitoring of communications at the largest Internet providers (seemingly with the help of these providers). This list of Internet providers includes Microsoft, Google, Yahoo, Facebook, PalTalk, YouTube, Skype, AOL, and Apple. Now, I want to point out that these are all allegations and that none of this has been verified yet. However, it certainly raises a lot of questions. I wanted to hone in one of the areas that I took note of. There was a mention in this report of other providers the government wanted to monitor, including Dropbox. This again exposes some of the risks that are faced not only by consumers using Dropbox (and similar services) but also the exposure that enterprises and enterprise users face when using these types of services.

Wired Up!

How can we keep data secure and protected while allowing employees to work on whatever device makes them most productive? This is a topic that is top of mind for many IT departments as mobile devices and Macs infiltrate the enterprise, and something I discussed in an article featured on Wired.com and Wired’s Innovation Insights.

Many would agree that two copies are better than one. But redundancy has its cost, too. And then you have management overheads for two backup destinations and uncertainty of your recovery success rate with tape, disk or cloud. Sounds like a puzzle to solve. The key to efficient backup strategy with guaranteed outcome is to clearly define which goal you meet with each type of backup, and combine the two in the right way. Hybrid is not just about two copies, software vendors or service providers. It’s about making a smart – and budget-friendly – decision about your entire backup and recovery plan.

Virtualization: It comes with enormous opportunities for organizations of all sizes. On the other hand, it serves up a number of intense challenges. Among these challenges is the increased risk of data loss and massive outage.

Don’t fret. You can manage these challenges, head on. You just need to find the right solution – ideally, one that includes these seven elements:

1. Cross-vendor choice and flexibility. When you choose a backup and recovery solution, you may not want to be locked into a single vendor. Maybe you would prefer affordable cross-hypervisor data migration, backup and disaster recovery – executed across disparate systems, different sites and multiple vendors. Single and multiple vendor solutions can both work – the key is picking a solution that gives you a choice.

Backups and Business Continuity: Cavemen Were on to Something

The idea of a “backup” has been in place since man first started cherishing things that they valued. A smart caveman that loved a certain spear probably made an attempt to reproduce that in case it was to break. Since then we have changed a little, and there have been carbon copies, punch card backups, tape backups, etc. And for as long as electronic backups have been around, there have been relatively few major revolutions. Okay, sure, you can argue tapes, replication, virtualization, cloud and Big Data have all made people think about how they will back up the hybrid technologies. And every time a Sandy-like storm or major incident occurs, there’s always a sense of heightened awareness around backups and business continuity. But awareness doesn’t restore the data. I always love to hear about the people (and subsequent companies) that know that if they suffer a major data loss, they would be dead in the water, but still don’t change their habits after close calls.

How to Back Up a Mac at Work

Do you ever ask yourself: "How can I backup a Mac at work?" In the past, most corporate IT departments did not really have to think about this. Macs used to be a rarity in corporate IT. But now that the executive adoption of Apple products has finally broken down the protective walls of corporate IT standards, and bring-your-own-device (BYOD) is the new rule of the land, things have changed significantly. A growing number of companies offer employees the option to choose an Apple laptop as the machine provided for work or alternatively to bring their own Mac. Consequently, IT departments are confronted with an expanding ingress of Mac clients into their world, previously existing more or less peacefully under the rule of Microsoft.